Monday, February 28, 2011

MONDAY MISCELLANEA

Random pictures from my image morgue.
Alphonse Maria Mucha

Adam Highes

liam-stock.deviantart.com/


Fastner and Larsen

Lu Kimmel

Patrick J. Jones

Basil Gogos

Robert McGinnis

Greg Manchess at work
Claudia Schiffer

Ed Emshwiller




I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

INNSMOUTH FREE PRESS

Innsmouth Free Press is an independent Canadian publication and they are having a fundraising drive this month. In order to raise funds to keep the magazine going they are offering anumber of perks including a free novella by author Joshua Reynolds to which I have contributed an illustration.

As Joshua puts it:

So, February is Fundraising Month at Innsmouth Free Press. They're attempting to raise the modest sum of $1,500 CAD and because I enjoy the magazine (seriously, check out issue 4), I decided to help out in my own small way (yes, I have indeed also donated cash but this is more fun).

FREE STUFF, that's the point I'm trying to get across here.

Specifically, a free 10,000 word novelette. "The Black-Winged Ones" follows occultist Harley Warren and former-inspector John Raymond Legrasse as they investigate a series of bloody murders and stumble upon a hideous conspiracy in turn-of-the-century New Orleans.

Tthere's only a few days left to donate to the Innsmouth Free Press fundraiser and to acquire the "The Black-Winged Ones". Remember, a donation of ANY AMOUNT (be it a buck, be it a hundred) gets you the novella when the fundraiser ends on March 1st, so even if you're strapped for cash, a token donation will get you some sweet-sweet occult detective action. Oh, and to those of you who HAVE donated, thanks!
The ilustration looks a little like this:


If you want to see the rest of it and read the terriffic story by Josh then head over to Innsmouth Free Press and make a donation and support independent publishers.



I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio
 

Monday, February 21, 2011

SAD NEWS


I drew this picture for a friend of mine and my wife's. Our friend was a wonderful, loving person and she loved dragons.

We got news this weekend that our friend had been killed -- a victim of domestic violence.

So I don't feel much like blogging for a while.

I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Friday, February 18, 2011

SHEER, ABSOLUTE, BLOODY BRILLIANCE





You can read more here.


I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Thursday, February 17, 2011

NEW YORK MOVIE




New York Movie, Edward Hopper, 1939


It was an hour and-a-half into the main feature and Lilly was bored.

She stood at the foot of the stairs leading to the balcony, leaning against the wall, listening to Gary Cooper's voice as it came from the speakers.

Beau Geste.

It was a great movie but she'd seen it three times. She could almost quote the dialogue. She'd been a movie usher for three years and she'd seen them all.

She shifted her weight from one foot to the other. She looked down at her crisply starched trousers with the red stripe. The slacks were nice. They were comfortable, but the matching blue jacket didn't fit quite right and sometimes it felt like it was choking her.

Her shoes were pretty and she loved them but standing around in them for three hours at a time was hell on her feet. And she had to stand here. She couldn't nip out for a quick smoke in the back alley. Not that she would. The back alley was where the projectionist usually went for a smoke and she didn't like the way that he looked at her.

She shifted her flashlight from one hand to another, then held it under her arm when she noticed a bit of lint on her slacks. The lint turned out to be a bit of candy that was stuck to the fiber. She had to use a lacquered nail to pick it off. She made a disgusted noise as the sticky remnant came free of the fabric.

Her flashlight slipped from under her arm and dropped to the floor, rolling on the carpet. She uttered a curse under her breath as she followed it, stooping to pick it up before it rolled any further.

As she stood she looked up at the screen. Gary Cooper was speaking earnestly to Ray Milland his dusty Foreign Legion jacket looking just about as uncomfortable as hers.

That was when he turned and looked at the camera.

That was odd. Lilly didn't remember him doing that before. Copper turned back to Milland. Milland was speaking now but did Cooper seem distracted? He seemed to be. Odd that she didn't notice that before. Cooper was usually the more focussed of the two.

He did it again. Lilly stood up straight and stared up at the flickering screen. Cooper was turned away from Milland and he seemed to be scanning the audience.

That had not happened the last time she had watched the movie. She was certain of that. Had the projectionist made a mistake? Had he slipped on a gag reel or something?

Cooper held up a hand to stop Milland. "Hold on, Ray," he said.

Ray? The character's name was John. What was going on?

Cooper walked forward and his steely gaze looked out into the audience. He seemed to be searching for someone in particular. "Excuse me," he said from the screen. "Who's crying?"

The audience looked at each other, confused. Lilly stared in open mouthed shock at the screen.

A woman stood up shakily in the middle of the theater. "Me," she said in a weak, mousy voice. "I'm the one who was crying." The audience turned to look at her. Lilly did as well. She remembered her. She was small and thin and bespectacled. She'd come in and sat by herself.

"Why are you crying?' Gary Cooper asked, his face a mask of loving concern.

The woman glanced around nervously at the other patrons. She shook her head. "I've been in New York for a week and..." she stopped, her finger twisting a handkerchief. Her voice had an accent that Lilly thought sounded southern. "...I don't know anybody here and I can't find a job and... and there's just so much noise and so many people rushing this way and that... I just... I just thought I'd escape for a few hours. But when the picture started I just... I just..."

Cooper held up a hand, shushing her gently. "Don't cry. It's alright. Listen, why don't you tell me where you'd rather be right now?"

"Alpena, South Dakota," the woman sobbed.

Lilly's brows raised. South Dakota?

On the screen even Cooper seemed a little nonplussed for a couple of frames. but he quickly recovered (he was a great actor, after all) and gave her his trademark smile. "Well, then what are you doing sittin' there? Go on. Get back to Alpena. Go back to the family that loves you."

"Really?" the woman said staring at Cooper's giant monochrome face. "For real?"

"For real," Cooper said, smiling. "Go on, now. Pack your things and head on home!"

"I will!" the woman said and she ran to the aisle, clumsily climbing over moviegoers that were in her way. Halfway up she turned and waved at Cooper. "Thank you, Mister Cooper! Thank you!"

"You're welcome," Cooper said.

The woman dashed out of the theater past Lilly "I'm going home!" she said excitedly as she ran out the door.

Back on the screen Cooper smiled in a satisfied way. "Another happy ending," he said.

The music swelled. The scene faded to black and a title car came up proclaiming: THE END.

The theater lights came on and the moviegoers stared at each other, blinking in confusion. Then they began to get up from their seats.

One older man turned to his wife. "That was the worst movie I've ever seen," he said.

Lilly couldn't help but agree. And she'd seen them all.

END




I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

WONDER WOMAN!

NBC has found its Wonder Woman!




"Friday Night Lights star Adrianne Palicki has landed the coveted lead role in the broadcaster’s reboot of the classic 1970s series.


In addition to having won praise for her performance on FNL, Palicki looks, well… spot-on perfect for the part, yes?

Wonder Woman is being remade by Boston Legal writer David E. Kelley, who has incorporated the superhero’s signature lasso, cuffs, and plane in the script. The script is a serious, non-campy take on the DC Comics character that pays homage to TV’s original WW Lynda Carter, but it should satiate those fans of Kelley’s memorable soapbox moments his legal dramas: At one point, Diana gives a speech on Capitol Hill."
I thought I'd be first with this news but I see I've been scooped by Cal at the Cave of Cool. Oh well, there's a reason why he's a blogstar and I am not.

You can read more here.


I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

LIFE ON MARS

Why am I posting this? I got nothing else today so...why not?


video




I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

STEAMPUNK PANIC

PANIC AT THE DISCO! has a new video out for their song The Ballad of Mona Lisa and they've done a bit of a stempunk thing.

Have a look:



I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

...and he's back to being AMAZING!


Come on, everyone, you know the words;
Spider-Man, Spider-Man,
Does whatever a spider can...




I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio
Come on! Sing!

A FUTURE MADE OF GLASS

This is Corning's vision of the future:



It's a future where your glass surfaces are smarter than you are, everything is impossibly clean, and everyone is so pretty it hurts.

Honestly, I don't see a place for myself in this future. I've broken many a Corning product in my time. Sometimes it seems I can't go a day without breaking something made of glass. You know why I'm not in this future? I'm locked up, that's why. I'm a dangerous criminal in Corning's utopia.

They just better hope the prison they have me in isn't made of glass, becasue if it is I'll be out in no time wreaking havok of this pretty vision of the future.

I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Monday, February 14, 2011

FLO AT THE GRAMMYS



So I did watch the Grammy Awards last night, although not all of it. My daughter and my wife were more interested in it than I was. I was busy drawing but I caught bits of it as I walked in and out of the office to refill my tea cup.

I did see Florence Welsh taking part in the tribute to Aretha Franklin (along with some other singers) which was great. I thought she did really well and she looked fantastic. But my question is: How come Florence and the Machine didn't perform?

I mean, they let Gwyneth Paltrow sing and dance her bony ass all over Cee Lo Green's piano (She looked so skinny I bet that any of those muppets dancing along could have taken her at least two falls out of three) and they let that eminem kid just go on and on (you know. for a guy named after a candy he sure is an angry man), they let Lady Gaga crawl out of her egg (was it just me or was her "new" tune a little bit familiar? Just like Madonna Lady Gaga doesn't seem to have any trouble expressing herself) but no Florence?

As Popeye said: "I am disgutipated!"

Oh well. We can always watch their videos.




I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Sunday, February 13, 2011

MARGARET BRUNDAGE






Margaret Brundage is one of my all-time favourite pulp artists.

Margaret Brundage was born Margaret Hedda Johnson on December 9, 1900 in Chicago, IL. She studied fashion design at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts from 1921-23, but failed to graduate.



Her first pulp cover was for the September 1932 Oriental Stories. She eventually sold 66 original pulp cover illustrations to Weird Tales from 1933 to 1945. Brundage covers were very popular with the readers of Weird Tales, but most of the public was not aware of the artist’s gender, because her work was usually signed “M. Brundage.” When puritanic social forces complained about the overt sexuality of Weird Tales cover art, the editor finally revealed that the artist was a woman, hoping to mollify the perceived offensiveness of her work. It didn’t help.


Aside from the remarkable aesthetic of her approach to pulp art, and the rarity of her being a woman in a field that was almost entirely composed of men, Brundage was also unique in the fact that most of her work is created with pastel on illustration board.







After the publishers of Weird Tales moved to NYC in 1938, Brundage continued to create fantasy scenes in pastel for the rest of her life, but she was never again able to find a steady publisher for her work.She appeared at a number of science fiction conventions and art fairs, where some of her original period works were stolen. Yet she never fully recovered financially from the loss of regular work at WT; her later years were spent in relative poverty.

She continued to work until her death in 1976.













I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

Saturday, February 12, 2011

DARK WORLDS #3 RE-ISSUED

Here it is!

 
Special re-issue of the third issue of the Pulp-Descended magazine of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, Mystery and other genres. This issue features the Fantasy "The Tomb of the Amazon Queen" by Michael Ehart that was nominated for a Harper's Pen Award! Also included are "Roadblock", a space opera adventure by Jack Mackenzie, "The Storming of Big Spree" an historical adventure by David A. Hardy, "Bayou Mirage" a Dark Fantasy by E. P. Berglund, "Let Sleeping Dogs Lie", a detective Mystery by Nick Andreychuk, "Laocoon" a Weird Western by G. W. Thomas, "Communications Delay, SF by Lee Beavington, and a Pirate Fantasy "Immortals of the Cannibal Coast" by Joel Jenkins and Martin Edward Stephenson. Our review/Interview is for BURY ME DEEP by Joshua Reynolds. Also includes a Dark Worlds Club section. Original cover by Aaron Siddall. New cover by M. D. Jackson. Illustrations by M. D. Jackson, Aaron Siddall, Sam deGraff and G. W. Thomas.
You can get more info and see a preview here.

I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio

HOWARD IN WEIRD TALES



It's no secret that I love Robert E. Howard. I also really love illustrations from old pulp magazines. So when I found these I just had to share.

These are original illustrations for Robert E. Howard stories from Weird Tales. Subsequent illustrators of Howard's stories (Roy G. Krenkel, Frank Frazetta, Ken Kelley to name but a few) are much more widely recognized so seeing these early Hugh Rankin illustrations is a rare treat.



Hugh Rankin was introduced as the new interior artist for Weird Tales in July 1927. Rankin did his first illustration of a Robert E. Howard story in the March 1928 issue. The story was "The Hyena." At one point, Howard stated that Rankin was his personal favorite of all the artists that illustrated his work in Weird Tales. He also signed some of his work with the name Doak.









Those illustrations were done in a style different from his familiar one. Unfortunately, a lot of the work Rankin did for Weird Tales was so poorly reproduced that his abilities were not always apparent. Rankin continued to work for Weird Tales until the mid-thirties.

Rankin's second Howard illustration was for "Red Shadows," the first Solomon Kane story, in the August 1920 issue. This was followed by his illustration for the Howard poem, "The Harp of Alfred," which was featured in the September 1928 issue.

You can read and see more here.



I've been here and there. I've drawn a lot of pictures. I've written a bit, too. I'm not good at this self-promotion thing. Look, you want to know about me? just visit these websites. Okay?
www.mdjacksonart.weebly.com
http://mdjackson.deviantart.com
http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/mdjacksons%5Fportfolio
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